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LINKING AND THINKING


In my experience, mostly people do not think; they link. Link is associating images, events, memories. A woman might look in a shop window, for example, and see a green dress which reminds her of a dress she had when she was 18.  Her mind then drifts back to her college days and her first boyfriend. She then wonders what had happened to him and she remembers that she had seen his picture in the paper a while back. Was it because he was a lawyer and the article was about a case he was defending? she wonders. And so the links continue. She might then carry on walking down the street and as she passes a drugstore, she remembers that she has run out of washing-up liquid and that she has to buy some. She looks at her watch and notices it is late, so she decides to pop into the store on her way home. And so it continues.


This is not thinking, but linking. Thinking is deliberately, consciously picking a subject and creatively thinking it through—looking at all the arguments, exhausting the subject and bringing the matter to a conclusion, whether it is final or an interim staging post. Real thinking has a continuous nature and is cooling to the systems—it is very good for the brain; it is a bit like taking your brain to the gym. The more you exercise, the easier it becomes. In our fragmented and busy world, we mostly have little time for real thinking, but to do so regularly will pay back in abundance. It allows a person to become quiet inside and to follow a train of thought; it might be surprising and inspiring to see where it leads.



EXERCISE

Take half an hour in your busy day and find a quiet spot. Turn off your cell phone, the radio, the television, the computer and, if possible, disconnect your main line phone as well. Take a pen and paper and write down your thoughts—do not censor yourself but write everything as it occurs to you. Be honest; after all, no one needs to read what you have written; you can tear it up and throw it away when you have finished the exercise. So let it flow. Then leave it for a few days and then re-read it aloud to yourself.  See how disjointed (or continuous) your thoughts are and look out for trends.


If possible, do this daily for a whole month and see if the patterns of your thoughts are changing over time. What are the major reoccurring themes, concerns, worries, inspirations?


Having observed your brain patterns for a whole month, then try to pick a subject that interests you and write about it for an entire half hour. Try to stay with it and even if something distracts you, return to the subject you are exploring. Perhaps now you are ready to think for real!


The one-sentence coach says, “Thinking is a great gift—it is a tool of discovery and connection to universal wisdom and energy; learn to use it and value it, and it will lead you into enchanted realms where sages, muses and poets abide.”



EXERCISE

When you have some spare time, sit down with a list of your friends, colleagues or clients and try to think of each one in turn. Try to imagine their faces, their postures, their behaviors and gestures and see if you can connect to them energetically. See if you can detect what is happening with them right now—how are they feeling, what is on their mind, who are they spending time with, what are they doing? Make a note of what you register and find out how accurate you have been next time you see them.


You might just surprise yourself!


The one sentence coach says: “It is possible to know about another person from a distance, without computers or telephones—just try using your faculties to connect to another person’s energies.”


LINKING AND THINKING


In my experience, mostly people do not think; they link. Link is associating images, events, memories. A woman might look in a shop window, for example, and see a green dress which reminds her of a dress she had when she was 18.  Her mind then drifts back to her college days and her first boyfriend. She then wonders what had happened to him and she remembers that she had seen his picture in the paper a while back. Was it because he was a lawyer and the article was about a case he was defending? she wonders. And so the links continue. She might then carry on walking down the street and as she passes a drugstore, she remembers that she has run out of washing-up liquid and that she has to buy some. She looks at her watch and notices it is late, so she decides to pop into the store on her way home. And so it continues.


This is not thinking, but linking. Thinking is deliberately, consciously picking a subject and creatively thinking it through—looking at all the arguments, exhausting the subject and bringing the matter to a conclusion, whether it is final or an interim staging post. Real thinking has a continuous nature and is cooling to the systems—it is very good for the brain; it is a bit like taking your brain to the gym. The more you exercise, the easier it becomes. In our fragmented and busy world, we mostly have little time for real thinking, but to do so regularly will pay back in abundance. It allows a person to become quiet inside and to follow a train of thought; it might be surprising and inspiring to see where it leads.



EXERCISE

Take half an hour in your busy day and find a quiet spot. Turn off your cell phone, the radio, the television, the computer and, if possible, disconnect your main line phone as well. Take a pen and paper and write down your thoughts—do not censor yourself but write everything as it occurs to you. Be honest; after all, no one needs to read what you have written; you can tear it up and throw it away when you have finished the exercise. So let it flow. Then leave it for a few days and then re-read it aloud to yourself.  See how disjointed (or continuous) your thoughts are and look out for trends.


If possible, do this daily for a whole month and see if the patterns of your thoughts are changing over time. What are the major reoccurring themes, concerns, worries, inspirations?


Having observed your brain patterns for a whole month, then try to pick a subject that interests you and write about it for an entire half hour. Try to stay with it and even if something distracts you, return to the subject you are exploring. Perhaps now you are ready to think for real!


The one-sentence coach says, “Thinking is a great gift—it is a tool of discovery and connection to universal wisdom and energy; learn to use it and value it, and it will lead you into enchanted realms where sages, muses and poets abide.”



EXERCISE

When you have some spare time, sit down with a list of your friends, colleagues or clients and try to think of each one in turn. Try to imagine their faces, their postures, their behaviors and gestures and see if you can connect to them energetically. See if you can detect what is happening with them right now—how are they feeling, what is on their mind, who are they spending time with, what are they doing? Make a note of what you register and find out how accurate you have been next time you see them.


You might just surprise yourself!


“It is possible to know about another person from a distance, without computers or telephones—just try using your faculties to connect to another person’s energies.”


For more articles by Joanna, check out www.Suite101.com